Donoghue v Stevenson

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Donoghue v Stevenson – Appeal Papers – Appellant’s Case

Appellant's Case Page 6

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Appellant's Case

RECORD
(As Amended)


Condescendence and Answers

6

into the said bottle, render the said ginger-beer dangerous and harmful, and be sold with the said ginger-beer. Further, it was the duty of the defender to provide a system of working his business that was safe, and would not allow snails to get into his ginger-beer bottles (including the said bottle). Such a system is usual and customary, and is necessary in the manufacture of a drink like ginger-beer to be used for human consumption. In these duties the defender culpably failed, and pursuer's illness and shock were the direct result of his said failure in duty. The pursuer believes and avers that the defender's system of working his business was defective, in respect that his ginger-beer bottles were washed and allowed to stand in places to which it was obvious that snails had freedom of access from outside the defender's premises, and in which, indeed, snails and the slimy trails of snails were frequently found. Further, it was the duty of the defender to provide an efficient system of inspection of said bottles before the ginger-beer was filled into them, and before they were sealed. In this duty also the defender culpably failed, and so caused the said accident. The defender well knew, or ought to have known, of the frequent presence of snails in those parts of his premises where the ginger-beer bottles were washed and dried, and further, ought to have known of the danger of small animals (including snails) getting into his ginger-beer bottles. The pursuer believes and avers the the said snail, in going into the said bottle, left on its path a slimy trail, which should have been obvious to anyone inspecting the said bottle before the ginger-beer was put into it. In any event, the said trail of the snail should easily have been discovered on the bottle before the bottle was sealed, and a proper (or indeed any) inspection would have revealed the presence of the said trail and the said snail, and the said bottle of ginger-beer wit the snail in it would not have been placed for sale in the said shop. Further, the defender well knew, or in any event ought to have known, that small animals like mice or snails left in aerated-water (including ginger-beer), and decomposing there, render aerated-water exceedingly dangerous and harmful to persons drinking the contaminated aerated-water. Accordingly, it was his obvious duty to provide clear ginger-beer bottles, so as to

Appellant's Case Page 6